Commercial

New Nav Canada RPAS Coordination Process Announced

Nav Canada has announced their new process for coordinating RPAS in controlled airspace:  http://www.navcanada.ca/EN/products-and-services/RPAS/Pages/default.aspx

We would like to inform you of some important changes that may impact the operation of your remotely piloted aircraft (RPA). As of June 1, 2019, new Transport Canada regulations will apply to all RPA operating in Canadian airspace. For more information on these new regulations, visit Transport Canada’s Drone Safety page​.

If you plan to operate your RPA in controlled airspace (Classes C, D or E), you must have a Transport Canada Pilot Certificate – Advanced Operations, and you must now obtain a written RPAS Flight Authorization from NAV CANADA, by submitting an RPAS Flight Authorization Request. This written authorization process replaces any previous email or telephone method and is now the only way to receive NAV CANADA authorization to fly your RPA in controlled airspace.

For more information or to submit an RPAS Flight Authorization Request, please visit our new RPAS webpage.
Mark Telewiak
Airport Operations Specialist | Spécialiste de l’expoitation aéroportuaire
Regional Training Specialist | Spécialiste, Formation régionale
NAV CANADA
mark.telewiak@navcanada.ca
6055 Midfield Road, Mississauga, ON, L4W 2P7
T. 905-676-4609 C. 416-540-1078
www.navcanada.ca

The main take away is 2-14 days required processing time.

Depending on the complexity of your request, expect a minimum of 48 hours to 14 days for review.  You cannot operate your RPA in controlled airspace unless you receive a written RPAS Flight Authorization from NAV CANADA.​ Failure to comply with legal requirements when flying an RPA, including failure to obtain an RPAS Flight Authorization from NAV CANADA before flying an RPA in controlled airspace, can give rise to serious penalties, including fines and jail time.

It becomes hard to operate a business and plan operations with such a wide ranging service level.  This really impacts the industry in a bad way.  Concerns on such delays were raised in the draft regulations but it seems that went unheard.

DJI Drones Meet New Transport Canada Requirements For Flight Near People

May 29, 2019 – DJI, the world’s leader in civilian drones and aerial imaging technology, is pleased to declare that nine of its models meet the new Transport Canada requirements taking effect June 1 for drone flight within 30 meters (100 feet) of people. The new declaration, along with DJI’s previously declared compliance with new requirements for drone flight in controlled airspace, allows DJI customers to use their preferred drones for a variety of safe, responsible and beneficial uses across Canada.

“DJI customers choose our drones because they know our longstanding history of making powerful, reliable and dependable aerial platforms, and we are proud to say they can continue using our products under the new Transport Canada system beginning June 1,” said Javier Caina, DJI Director of Technical Standards. “We have put months of effort into documenting our safety expectations, testing standards, reliability guidelines and other processes to comply with Transport Canada’s new requirements. Thanks to this effort, we are able to confirm that our customers can continue flying DJI drones in controlled airspace and near people when the new rules take effect.”

Transport Canada announced its new regulatory framework for certain types of advanced civilian drone operations in January, requiring the use of drones whose manufacturer has declared that its drones meet reliability and operational characteristics under a safety assurance framework. DJI drones that can be used near people and in controlled airspace are the M600 Series, M200 Series, M200 V2 Series, Inspire 2, Mavic 2 series, Mavic Pro, Mavic Air, Phantom 4 series and Spark. The new declaration is expected to soon be reflected in Transport Canada’s list of drones eligible for advanced operations at this link.

DJI has long set the standard for safe operations in the drone industry, pioneering a series of technological improvements and educational systems to help ensure drones retain their admirable safety record. Most recently, DJI released “Elevating Safety,” its 10-point plan for government and industry to work together on keeping the skies safe in the drone age. As part of this effort, DJI will install AirSense, which warns drone pilots of nearby airplanes and helicopters, in all new drone models weighing more than 250 grams launched after Jan. 1, 2020. DJI will also create a new warning system for drone pilots flying at extended distances, and create an internal Safety Standards Group to document technical expectations and study performance results. More details on these initiatives are available at dji.com/flysafe.

https://www.dji.com/newsroom/news/dji-drones-meet-new-transport-canada-requirements-for-flight-near-people

Transport Canada – Drone Assurance Declaration Online Submission Form

The online submission form for the new Transport Canada drone regulations is now live at: https://www.tc.gc.ca/en/services/aviation/drone-safety/submit-drone-safety-assurance-declaration.html

As per the information listed:

Who can submit a declaration

  • The designer and manufacturer of a drone
  • Third-party drone modifiers
  • Individuals who design and build “home-built” drones

About the RPAS safety assurance declaration

You can declare that your RPAS can safely conduct any or all of the following operations so pilots can register their drones for advanced operations:

  • Operations in controlled airspace
  • Operations near people: less than 30 meters (100 feet) but more than 5 meters (16.4 feet) horizontally
  • Operations over people: less than 5 meters (16.4 feet) horizontally

How to comply

Adding safety features to a drone, such as a deployable parachute, can help it meet the safety requirements for advanced operations.

Advisory Circular AC 922-001: Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems Safety Assurance provides guidance on complying with the regulations and standards. For a copy of the draft AC contact: TC.RPASDeclaration-DeclarationSATP.TC@tc.gc.ca.

Penalties

We may fine you if you falsely declare to meet the technical requirements set out in Standard 922 — RPAS Safety Assurance. You may be fined $3,000 for a person and $15,000 for a corporation for each registered system.

What you need to know before you apply

You do not need to submit the results of the AC 922-001 Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems Safety Assurance verification tests along with your declaration of RPAS Safety Assurance. However, you may be asked to produce the results of verification tests at a later date.

New Canadian Drone Regulations – Maritime Info Sessions

Transport Canada will be holding information sessions on the new regulations.  Below is the schedule for the first events in the Maritimes.


Following the publication of the Regulations Amending the Canadian Aviation Regulations (Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems) on January 9, 2019, Transport Canada officials will be hosting public information sessions to answer questions on the new regulations.

The first sessions will be held:

Date Time Venue Registration
Tuesday, February 19, 2019 1400-1600 Halifax Central Library – Paul O-Regan Hall

5440 Spring Garden Road

Halifax, NS

B3J 1E9

In-person
Wednesday, February 20, 2019 1800-2000 University of Prince Edward Island – Climate Research Lab

550 University Avenue

Charlottetown, PEI

C1A 4P3

Space is limited so please contact climate@upei.ca with your name, affiliation, email and mailing address to reserve your spot
Thursday, February 21, 2019 1900-2100 Fredericton Convention Centre – Pointe Sainte Anne Room

670 Queen Street

Fredericton NB

E3B 1C2

In-person

Additional sessions in other regions will be scheduled shortly.

For further information on drone safety rules, please visit Canada.ca/drone-safety.

New Canadian Drone Regulations – DND Aerodromes

As we previously wrote, operations within 3nm of a DND managed aerodrome will still require SFOCs under the new regulations, and are not part of standard Advanced operations.

For clarification on this issue and its impact on operators that fly frequently in these zones, we reached out to Transport Canada for clarification on how this will be managed:

Our intention is to issue a standing SFOC to cover these types of situations and you should be able to work with DND and NAV Canada to continue to operate as you have been.

This is reassuring to know it can be dealt with under Standing SFOCs.

We have asked further on if an assured UAV is required under such an SFOC and are awaiting further information.