SFOC

TC RPAS Task Force Regulatory Update on Proposed Canadian Regulations – Oct 30 2018

During the USC Conference recently held in Vancouver (Oct 30 2018), Transport Canada provided an update on the proposed changes to Canadian legislation governing UAV/drones, which are now officially called Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS).

No solid date was given on when we will see the final version but they are targeting before end of 2018.

Roll-out will be done over a 6 month period once the regulations are published in Canada Gazette Part II.

The following is a summary of proposed regulations:

  • Single weight class from 250g-25kg for VLOS operations
  • Single set of regulations for recreational and commercial use
  • Operations fall into two types of operations: Basic, Advanced

Basic:

  • Class G Airspace Only
  • 1nm from heliports, 3nm from airports
  • No aircraft design standard requirement
  • Aircraft must be registered and marked with #
  • Basic online test for license
  • 14 or older unless supervised
  • No speed restrictions
  • Operations within built-up areas permitted
  • No operations over people, 30M distance
  • Max altitude 400′
  • Night operations permitted
  • Not specific distance from pilot but must be VLOS
  • No liability insurance required

Advanced:

  • Class G, C-F Airspace
  • Operations near aerodromes with ATC approval
  • Manufacturers declare RPAS safety assurance
  • Aircraft must be registered and marked with #
  • Comprehensive online test and in person flight review for license
  • 16 or older unless supervised
  • No speed restrictions
  • Operations within built-up areas permitted
  • Operations over people if assurance allows, 0-30M from people.
  • Max altitude 400′
  • Night operations permitted
  • Not specific distance from pilot but must be VLOS
  • No liability insurance required

Details on manufacture assurance process are TBA.

Slides courtesy of Calvin Reich via UAV Task Force at the Unmanned Systems Conference

PNR SFOCs – Checklists are Back

After a period of all regions being fairly consistent on the use of the National SFOC Application Form across the country, PNR has reintroduced a new checklist form that is now mandatory as part of the application process.

The following was received from one of our clients on Oct 19 2018 as part of a recent Standing SFOC renewal application.

We are experiencing a backlog in our processing at the moment and our processing times are higher than usual.

In order to help speed up the review process we ask you to complete this checklist.  This will help with the amount of time it takes to find all of the important information within your SFOC application form.

Your application for issuance of an SFOC for the operation of a UAV is currently in the queue and will be assigned to a Civil Aviation Inspector for review as soon as resources allow.  Please find attached a checklist of required information that the Inspectors will be looking for in order to approve your application.  In order to expedite the application process, you need to complete the checklist prior to the file being considered complete for assignment to an Inspector.  The instructions are clearly laid out at the top of the page.  You MUST respond to every item on the checklist.  Where the answer checked is YES, provide the document name and page number where the information required can be found.  Where the answer checked is NO or N/A, provide a comment explaining why your application does not include the information. Note that each item contains a reference where further information/elaboration can be found.  Additionally, there is a short section of guidance material at the bottom of the document which should clarify some of the more common issues/questions.

Please send this completed checklist to PNRSpecialFlightOps@tc.gc.ca and upon receipt, your application will be assigned to the next available Inspector.  If you have any questions or require clarification, email PNRSpecialFlightOps@tc.gc.ca and we will respond as soon as possible.

Form can be found here:
RDIMS-#14505380-v1-RDIMS-#14495773-V1-CHECKLIST_FOR_UAV_SFOC_REQUEST_EXT…

Executive Summary: Consultation Session on RPAS Regulations

Executive Summary: Consultation Session on Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) Regulations

On May 23th 2018, Transport Canada Civil Aviation (TCCA)’s Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) Task Force (formerly known as UAS Task Force) hosted a consultation session with targeted stakeholders to discuss the comments received following the pre-publication of the regulations in Canada Gazette Part I (July 2017), and to share the Department’s recommended changes for Canada Gazette Part II.

This document is the Transport Canada Summary on RPAS regulations and feedback discussed in the session.

Executive Summary – Consultation Session on RPAS Regulations

UAV Operations – Atlantic Canada – Nav Canada Coordination Changes

Received from Nav Canada…
 
December, 2017
 
UAV Operator’s in Atlantic Canada,
Effective 11 December 2017, the responsibility for coordinating UAV operations with ATS (Air Traffic Service) facilities has been moved from the Moncton Area Control Centre (Peter Hebert) to the Halifax Flight Information Centre (FIC).
UAV coordination is very important to the safety of the flying public.
For your convenience and to expedite this process, a centralized contact point, to meet the needs of the UAV operator, has been established. The Halifax Flight Information Centre (FIC) is your new contact point for Atlantic Canada. Telephones/emails are answered 24hrs a day, every day.
Our experienced specialists will take your information, notify the appropriate ATS agencies and issue appropriate notices (NOTAMs) as necessary. NOTAMs (notices of aviation activity for pilots and ATS facilities) will now be required when UAV operations meet certain parameters. This requirement does not inhibit the UAV operator’s activity, but does inform the flying public of the activity.
All we require is the following information:
a. Contact name and phone number
b. Radius (nautical mile (NM) or FT) of flight.
c. Location of flight (latitude and longitude in whole degrees, minutes, and seconds)
d. Maximum height (FT) of the flight
e. Description of the UAV:
i. Type
ii. Wingspan
iii. Weight
iv. Colour
f. Date, time and duration of intended flight
 
The Halifax FIC Specialist will then provide the UAV operator with a coordination number as a reference for any further contact with the FIC regarding the activity.
Aviation safety is our first concern and this information ensures that the aviation community is aware of your activity.
Please email UAV_QM@navcanada.ca or call 902 873-3227.
Regards,
 
Terry Chase
Manager, Halifax FIC

Proposed Canadian UAV Regs Review – Still No LiDAR Allowance

Under existing regulations the use of laser payloads, such as LiDAR requires a special approval from Health Canada as well as a “special” SFOC for such use.

This will not change in the proposed new regulations, laser devices such as LiDAR will still require an SFOC, and are excluded under the new regulation primary allowances.

900.26 No person shall operate an unmanned aircraft if the aircraft is transporting explosive, corrosive, flammable or biohazardous material or a payload consisting of a directed bright light source as defined in section 601.14 or a payload that can be jettisoned, self-propelled, dispersed or dropped unless the operation is conducted under a special flight operations certificate — UAS issued under section 904.03 and the pilot may conduct an operation set out in subsection 902.51(2).

This is in our view short sighted by Transport Canada, given the growing industrial use of LiDAR on UAVs and the fact many are eye safe devices, used without restriction on ground based vehicles already.